Janet Ellen Raasch

Janet Ellen Raasch

Janet Ellen Raasch is an experienced writer and ghostwriter who works closely with professional services providers – especially lawyers, law firms and consultants to the legal industry. She helps these professionals enhance their online reputations and achieve new business through publication of keyword-rich content for the Internet as well as copy for traditional print media. Continue Reading

Radio-age meets Internet-age: Millenials were born between 1981 and 2000

Posted in Ghostwriter, Legal personality

This is part five of a five-part article:

New law firm associates most likely belong to the Millennial generation, also called Gen Y.  These are lawyers age 33 and younger.

Transformative events that took place during the formative years of Millennials include 9/11, the war on terror, the Oklahoma City bombing, a rash of school shootings, the Great Recession and the first African-American president.  They grew up with iPods, laptops and smart phones.

“Millennials were doted on by their protective ‘helicopter’ parents,” said Turner, “who scheduled their every activity and praised them for every little success.  They grew up feeling confident, entitled and used to praise.  They grew up spending a lot of time with their parents and other adults.  They do not see older adults as superiors, but as peers.

”Because they grew up with the Internet, Millennials are used to working anywhere and at

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Radio-age meets Internet-age: Gen X was born between 1965 and 1980

Posted in Ghostwriter, Legal personality

This is part four of a five-part article:

Senior associates and junior partners at most law firms most likely belong to Gen X.  These are lawyers between age 34 and age 49.

Transformative events that took place during the formative years of Gen X include Nixon’s resignation, the Challenger disaster, Desert Storm, AIDS, and the recession and resultant job loss of 1973-195.

“With dual-career parents either at work or divorced,” said Turner, “Gen X grew up as ‘latch-key’ kids who knew how to use a microwave to cook their own snacks and meals.  In addition, Gen X saw their parents and other adults laid off en masse by employers during the recession.  As a result, they see themselves as free agents and not long-term employees loyal to one employer.

“As a result,” said Turner, “Gen X grew up independent, self-directed and entrepreneurial.  They are highly skeptical

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Radio-age meets Internet-age: Boomers were born between 1946 and 1964

Posted in Ghostwriter, Legal personality

This is part three of a five-part article:

At most law firms, Boomers have matured into a leadership position.  These are lawyers between age 50 and age 68.

Transformative events that took place during the formative years of Boomers include the Cold War, the Space Race, the lunar landing, Vietnam, the Kennedy and King assassinations, and the civil and women’s rights movements.  The advent of the birth control pill dramatically changed women’s careers and launched the dual-career family.  They were the first generation to grow up with television.

“Boomers grew up challenging authority,” said Turner.  “Where their parents were frugal, they were self-indulgent and acquisitive – wanting the latest new homes in the suburbs, the consumer products to fill them and the cars to drive back and forth.  They worked long hours in order to fuel their acquisitive lifestyles.  They live to work.”

In the workplace,

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Radio-age meets Internet-age: Traditionals were born before 1946

Posted in Ghostwriter, Legal personality

This is part two of a five-part article:

Many law firms still have a number of “Traditionals” showing up at the office every day.  These are lawyers age 68 and older.

Transformative events that took place during the formative years of traditionals include Prohibition, the crash of the stock market and the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, the New Deal and two world wars.  In short, they grew up surrounded by a lot of jeopardy.

“To survive and succeed, Traditionals had to be frugal, self-sacrificing and hardworking,” said Turner.  “They learned to be reliable and reserved, to dress conservatively and to follow the rules.  When jobs are scarce, you do not want to rock the boat.  They got their news from newspapers and the radio.”

In the workplace, Traditionals were loyal to their firms.  “They expected to rise through the partnership track to hold one job

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Radio-age meets Internet-age: How do different generations of lawyers communicate?

Posted in Ghostwriter, Legal personality

An older lawyer wants a younger lawyer to return phone calls.  The younger lawyer wants the older to return texts.  An older lawyer wants to interact face-to-face.  The younger lawyer wants to interact electronically.  An older lawyer wants to see a younger lawyer well-dressed and at his or her desk.  The younger lawyer wants to be casually dressed and working remotely.

Have any of these situation come up at your law firm?

“A law firm can have as many as four different generations working together at the same time – and often on the same team,” said Caroline Turner.  “Each of these generations brings different expectations and styles to the table – depending on the cultural climate in which they grew up.  Each generation can be dismissive of the traits of those who are older or younger.”

Generations are strongly shaped by historic and technological developments

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Market research trends: Listening posts in an interactive environment

Posted in Competitive intelligence/research, Ghostwriter

Part five of a five-part article:

The best way to find out what is in the hearts and minds of your clients is to ask them – using both quantitative and (increasingly) quantitative methods.  These tools work not only for market research, but can also be used when creating persuasive and effective strategies for juries in the courtroom.

“To know what your clients are thinking and feeling, law firms must create a way for them to interact with you,” said Elkins.  “We call these methods ‘listening posts.’”

Listening posts can provide real-time monitoring on a set schedule of public opinion and trends, using surveys (online or phone), interviews and discussions.  Surveys can be general, to take the pulse of opinions and emerging trends, or specific, to track specific issues or activities.  Group discussions (online on in person) involving 6-24 people from a targeted group can delve deeply

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Market research trends: The best brands today solve problems

Posted in Competitive intelligence/research, Ghostwriter

Part four of a five-part article:

Today’s compelling law firm brand is not about the features of a product or service.  Instead, it is about meeting clients’ needs and solving clients’ problems.  The brand is about solutions.

“For example, retail customers rarely want to buy a drill just to have a drill,” said Elkins.  “They want to solve the problem of mounting a new shelf in the kitchen on which to place their cookbooks.  Ownership of a drill must be branded as leading to that result.”

Traditional branding efforts followed a linear pattern, with a beginning and an end.  This is the pattern most law firms are used to.

1.       Conduct market/brand research

2.       Understand the market perceptions of an entity’s brand, products or services

3.       Define (or redefine) the desired value proposition and brand promise

4.       Build

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Market research trends: The best brands today are interactive

Posted in Competitive intelligence/research, Ghostwriter

Part three of a five-part article:

In the past century, branding was a one-way process – delivered from the provider of the product or the service to the consumer of the product or service.  The brand was tightly controlled and conveyed to audiences using traditional mass media buys, placements and speaking engagements.

“Today, thanks to the Internet, branding is now much more interactive and collaborative,” said Elkins.  “It is created and controlled not by its owner, but by what clients and consumers say about the brand in the course of uncontrolled social media conversations.

“The consumer landscape is dynamic,” said Elkins.  “Brands must complement traditional methods of market research and message delivery with non-traditional, innovative research approaches that successfully reveal clients’ wants, wishes, desires and unmet needs.  Brands must be nimble enough to adapt quickly and engage across multiple touch points.”

 

For the entire

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Market research trends: The best brands today motivate using emotion

Posted in Competitive intelligence/research, Ghostwriter

Part two of a five-part article

Market research can be quantitative or qualitative.  Quantitative research is rational and delves into the minds of clients and potential clients.  It focuses on what, where and when.  It measures the incidence of views and opinions in a chosen sample.  It uses structured techniques such as online questionnaires, on-street interviews or telephone interviews.  It assumes a fixed and measurable reality that can be analyzed using and reported through statistics.

Qualitative research, on the other hand, delves into the value systems (hearts) of clients and potential clients. It focuses on the why and how of customer decision-making.   Its purpose is to gain an understanding of underlying reasons and motivations, and uncover trends.  It uses unstructured or semi-structured techniques such as face-to-face interviews or group discussions.  It assumed a dynamic and negotiated reality.  Data are analyzed by themes and reported in everyday language.

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Strong trends energize law firm market research

Posted in Competitive intelligence/research, Ghostwriter

Most lawyers believe that they know what their clients want.  Shockingly often, these lawyers are mistaken.  As a result, they make poor business and business development decisions.

Should we open a new office in a new region?  Should we add a new practice area?  Should we expand (or eliminate) an existing practice?  Should we target a particular kind of work in a particular industry?  What sets us apart from our competitors?

The only way to truly understand what clients and potential clients want from a lawyer or a law firm is to do market research that uncovers the truth in clients’ hearts and minds.  Client research is used to support law firm strategy and tactics that lead to better results and an improved bottom line.

“We know that to create, execute and maintain strong brands and client communications, law firms must understand how clients and potential

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